Skip to main content

About your Search

( more )
English 121
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 121 (some duplicates have been removed)
either because they are frustrated or because they want to get more training or education. some people are finding jobs. economists have looked at different calculations of which is the better factor -- the bigger factor, or people dropping out or getting more education and training and my understanding is that there are equal roles being played by each for spirit -- each force. but there are definitely some dropping out. some of that is the baby boom generation starting to retire. it may not be a "dropping out," but people choosing to retire and leave their jobs. some older people may have lost their jobs and cannot find new ones and are taking early social security benefits. there is some of that. host: mr. r doane, the labor force participation -- mr. nardone, a labor force position rick, please explain this. guest: the take the people who are employed in those who are unemployed and combine them and you get what is called the labour force. divide that by the population in at 16 and over and you're of the force participation rate. is the proportion of the population that is either e
about teachers and our future with education and you think about law enforcement and safety on the streets. we think about firefighters and things that we have had to do. we have not responded to doubt where would we be and what would have happened if we hadn't have done the things that would get the environment going again, the manufacturing of automobiles and general motors? >> moderator: you mentioned roads and bridges but what would you favor and how would you pay for his? boswell well i think we are going to have to raise the tax. i think we must do that and it will be indexed inflation but we have talked about that before. that is not new information for you. we talked about in the transportation infrastructure committee sometime ago. it was made between mr. young and mr. oberstar who talked to president bush at the time and he said he would veto it so that did not happen. we have got to do it. >> moderator: congressman boswell, believe you support president obama's stand that would raise taxes on people who make over $250,000 a year, is that correct? boswell: that's c
education and access to a quality education for all of america's citizens and public broadcasting has been an agency and part of the machinery that has delivered quality education at no cost to the public for many, many years. >> bill: when you say at no cost to the public, it's $450 million a year. that's a lot of taxpayer cost. but let me just ask you this: i like pbs programming especially for kids. you did a nice job for a long time on that and it was very educational. the sesame workshop, which is the big driver on pbstv, their assets, according to the irs 2011 filing, $356 billion. that's what the sesame workshop is worth. so i'm going to submit to you, mr. burton, that they can compete in the free marketplace like cartoon channel and others because we're in an era where we have to bring down the spending. of two do it. and you say? >> i say you're missing the point, bill. if you're going to focus on the $414 million, you are missing the point. america has always claimed to be the nation that wants to provide a quality education to all of its citizens. and i'm not saying that pbs i
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. this is actually about jobs and economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming
that the narrow focus on racial diversity in higher education has eclipsed larger issues of class and the quality, among colleges and universities. so, in advance of the u.s. supreme court's oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas, which will take place next week, the century foundation put together a report which i am going to outline which looks at the question, is it possible to create racial and ethnic diversity without using race, and instead paying attention to larger issues of economic equality in our society. it is called a better affirmative action. it makes three main points. the first, that racial affirmative action is likely on its way out. affirmative action based on race was always meant to be temporary by those who originally envisioned it, a deviation for a period of time away from the non-discrimination principle. but now there are both legal and political forces that appear to be bringing affirmative action to a end. to begin with, it is highly unpopular among average american voters. if you look at the supreme court briefs in the fisher case, you would think there i
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
, not for most people, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. mr. brown? >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, tha
really good academic education but they've also really gotten spectacular education in living with the folks who are the real virginia today. we're increasingly diverse state and that's an important part of medication. -- education. i would hope what the supreme court would do in this case would be they would affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions
jobs. we cannot slow up on education because that's the engine that is going to give us the economic growth and competitiveness that we need. and we are not going to slow up on the whole idea of providing for affordable health care for americans, none of which when we get to talk about health care is as my, as the governor characterized, characterized. the bottom line here is that we are going to, in fact, eliminate those wasteful spending that exist in the budget right now. a number of things i don't have time because the light is blinking that i won't be able to mention, but one of which is the $100 billion tax dodge that, in fact, allows people to take their post office box offshore, avoid taxes. i call that unpatriotic. i call that unpatriotic. that's what i'm talking about. >> moderator: governor? palin: well, the nice thing about running with john mccain is i can assure you he doesn't tell one thing to one group and then turns around and tells something else to another group, including his plans that will make this bailout plan, this rescue plan even better. i want to go back t
. the headline is that racial preferences and higher education definitely came under attack today. >> let's remind everyone, ten years ago, the u.s. supreme court upheld affirmative action, less than, 2003, what has changed since then? >> this case is factually similar to the university of michigan case nine years ago. what has changed is the court, justice sandra day o'connor wrote the majority opinion nine years ago upholding diversity as a compelling interest. o'connor is no longer on the court. today the person to watch is the justice anthony kennedy, not against the idea, but hasn't found the affirmative action program that is narrowly tailored enough for him to like it. >> what about the fact that justice elana kagan, she recused herself here, there could be a tie they could decide four justices one way, four another. what happens in that case? >> in that case, the previous precedent stands. so the university of michigan case from nine years ago would continue to be the law of the land if they ended up in a 4-4 tie. >> all right, joe johns, thank you very much. u.s. supreme court to
of the expenditures in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986 even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the ot
after the break. >>> still to come, guest host ken langone will cover the economy, candidates, education. and then this morning we'll invite you to "squawk box" office hours. a chance to talk with us on facebook. andrew will host today's session. check out our facebook page. >> getting a little air brushed. >> you'll beat the record for last time you did it. >>> "squawk box" is on facebook. like the show and get update, commentary, news and much more. add us to your pages and keep us with what's happening on the show. "squawk box" on facebook and cnbc. short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whateve
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> well, we have now officially gotten the big debate prep from brianna keilar for us, there in danville, kentucky. now we want to talk ryan and for that we go to jim acosta also in danville, kentucky. what are we, jim? looking at the clock. less than seven hours away from the big sparring. >> reporter: yeah. >> and you know, we know the romney campaign got a tremendous lift from the first debate, the presidential debate last week. what are the expectations for paul r
achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. you. we know you. we know you have to rise early... and work late, with not enough sleep in between. how you sometimes need to get over to that exit, like, right now. and how things aren't... just about you anymore. introducing the all-new, smart-sensing... honda accord. it starts with you. >>> in about 24 hours from you, vice president joe biden and republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan are going head to head in their only debate of the cycle. the tax discussion is going to be key. why suz president obama continue to spread falsehoods about the untrue romney $5 trillion tax cut? there is no such thing. but he calls him a liar. and that boils my blood a little bit. let's talk about this for a few moments. cnbc contributor jared bernst n bernstein. jared's got a lot at stake in this debate. >> and art laffer, laffer investments chief investment officer. i want to start with my pal, art laffer. where does this $5 trillion number
symbol of the fight for freedom and the fight for all girls to get an education. we get an update on her condition today from nbc's amna nawaz. she covers pakistan for us >> reporter: good evening, less than three days after she was shot by the taliban coming home from her school, malala yousufzai is showing signs of improvement. doctors deemed her stable enough today to be taken from peshawar to islamabad. the new area, which is more equipped and has more equipment. she is not out of danger, she is still unconscious, but they are now putting her chances of survival at 70%. meanwhile, across pakistan, people continue to take to streets to condemn the taliban attack and support malala yousufzai. one demonstrator said if they kill her, ten more will come forward. >> thank you. >>> a sad update from the gulf of mexico tonight, the coast guard confirmed an oil slick there is consistent with oil from the deep water horizon well, the source of the worst oil disaster in u.s. history. experts are not sure exactly where this sheen is coming from. bp says it is most likely residual oil that was us
anyone. melissa: okay. >> i'm educating my employees. i'm educating them. i am telling them what will probably happen if the wrong person gets reelected. melissa: are you trying to influence their vote? >> yes. because i'm trying to influence their vote because my employees are family to me. i'm like the mother who says eat your spinach, that is good for you. i think i know what is good for their future and i'm trying to get them to do the right thing. melissa: what specifically do you think would happen if president obama were reelected to another term and what specifically would it mean for your business? i mean are you worried about the credit environment? are you worried about the tax environment? >> i'm worried about the entire environment, all of the above. you know, i can be a monday morning quarterback. i've lived through four years of the obama administration. four years ago we were doing a billion dollars a year in sales. we had 12,000 employees. today as a result of the last four years we had to cut down to 7,000 employees, and only doing half of the business that we c
-old girl shot for defying taliban orders and going to school and being a champion of girls' education. we'll ask one champion of free speech why she thinks this issue is not getting the attention it deserves. the vice presidential debate is not until tomorrow but he's already being hit with the label "liar" by some top democrats. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types o
. they apply the worldwide economics of the labor market place to your value. a poorly educated semi motivated american worker is not a very valuable commodity on the world market. that is the problem. if he went the economy to improve -- if you want the economy to approve, we need to be nationalists -- global financial dominance is what is killing us. the investor class is ruining the worker class of america. host: 4 you yourself, has your idea of the american dream changed in the last couple of years? caller: i have been very fortunate. i would say it has. i am much more cynical now. there seems to be a minority of americans that believe the most important thing in the world is to get rich as soon as they can and they do not care how they do it. that is killing 80% of the american workers in this country. host: mary, where are you calling us from? caller: illinois. from what i heard from the last caller, i a greed. we cannot expect to be forever the super power most important person in the whole universe. we have to be part of the world and deal with what is out there. it is changing. host:
we should make sure we have a fair shot at the american dream, through our educational system. >> absolutely. professor, we know where mitt romney stands. as for paul ryan, he was asked directly -- i'm sorry, he wasn't, sorry, asked directly about affirmative action but let me show you what he said about those americans who live in the inner city. >> the best thing to help prevent violent crime in inner cities is to bring opportunity in inner cities, help people get out of poverty, teach people good discipline, good character. >> the republican's content breathtaking. >> wow. >> ryan suggests those lack discipline and character. this do they not realize four-fifths of the actual population now lives in an urban area? >> they probably don't realize that. judging from the limited amount of time their campaign has actually spent in urban areas, you can tell how much they value it. the problem with mr. ryan's comments here is he is ascribing inherent characteristics to being poor or living in the inner city. that's troubling and problematic. it plays to a lot of stereotypes and ra
interest in paul jennings when a was director of education at james madison's month bill yeare in virginia.viinia. i was familiar with jennings' f ore considered by the white house historical association tof be the first memoir of life in the white house.nocences of jams madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his retirement review hi
. there are, of course, moderates in iran. half of the country is weste westernized, highly educated. and there are moderates, but they don't run the country. on october 9th, 2012, who runs iran? do we still not know? >> in the intelligence business, iran is right up there with north korea as probably the hardest targets to really understand. >> certainly not ahmadinejad. >> no. supreme leader. >> it's the supreme leader along with -- >> the mullulahs. >> aren't they intimidated by the revolutionary guard? >> you've got the people financially essential to the regime. several power centers. but -- >> the supreme leader is first. and the answer is we don't really know. >> if we don't know that, the strategy here also psychological? and at what point do you start doing this publicly? isn't that a second step? start doing this publicly and aligning with the opposition publicly? isn't that to an extent potentially a destructive strategy if you're a little hand fisted about it? >> i would do it rather than later because the guys are feeling the heat. at the end of the day, mika, they've go
it says is it's a matter of priorities. who stands with the priorities that education, young people, all that. so that's why they're using it in that way. and i think that will play into the debate tonight just the way andrea was talking about because when you get to medicare, i think that biden has a clearly different point of view. when you get to spending, when you get to taxes. i think that's what big bird was about in terms of that ad saying to especially women, look at the priorities of the republicans -- >> women don't sit at home at night worrying about big bird. i'm telling you right now. i was not up thinking about big bird. i can assure you of that. the fact they're talking about big bird makes them look very, very unserious. and no offense to my five-year-old nephew, but he is talk being big bird. mitt romney is a bully, it's just so fifth grade. we knew that obama lacked maturity before. now we know for sure that his campaign does. >> steve: all right. >> i'm glad you're not worried about that. >> steve: "the five" is stuff a popular show. thank you for joining us live. >> h
for speaking out against islamic extremists and for promoting education for girls. she's been a target for the taliban because of outspoken views against the group. joining us is the attorney and director of the law fair project, brook goldstein, good morning to you, brook. >> good morning. >> dave: a horrific story. unfortunately, this is what focuses some attention worldwide on what these terror groups are doing, i mean, to children. what needs to be done? >> well, first of all, the issue of the deliberate targeting of innocent muslim children by slammist terrorist groups has gone way underreported and that it takes a shooting of a 14-year-old girl to focus world attention on this. >> alisyn: let's talk about the 14-year-old girl. she's extraordinary. she had been a vocal advocate for girls education in a place in the valley in pakistan where that is not necessarily a popular view, certainly by this taliban and she even started a blog. i mean, tell us why is she's such a great symbol? >> well, she's done something remarkable. she's managed to bring together the pakistani community wh
million people off medicare and kick 200,000 children off of early education, it will eliminate the tax credit people have to send their children to college. it cuts education by $450 billion. it does -- it does virtually nothing except continue to increase the tax cuts for the very wealthy. and you know, we have had enough of this. the idea that he's so concerned about the deficits, i pointed out, he voted to put two wars on a credit card-- >>> we are going to the closing statements in just a minute. youville -- >> not raising taxes is not cutting taxes. by the way, our budget -- >> we have not raised taxes. >> martha: let me calm things down here just for a minute. i want to talk to you very briefly before the closing statements about your personal character. if you were elected, what could you both give to this country, as a man, as a human being, that no one else could? >> honesty. no one else could? there are plenty of fine people who could lead this country. but what you need are people who when they say they are going to do manage, they do t. what you need, when people see proble
for the nation both in times of war and times of peace. for more than 107 years, vmi has done more than educate students. it has guided their transformation into citizens, warriors, and leaders. vmi graduates serve with honor in nation's defense, just as many are doing in afghanistan and other lands. i mourn with you the 15 brave souls who have been lost. i join with you and praying for the many vmi graduates who are right now serving in harm's way. may god bless all who serve and all who have served. of all the vmi graduates, and none is more distinguished, perhaps, then general george marshall, the chief of staff of the army became secretary of state, secretary of defense, helped to vanquish fascism and plant it europe's rescue from despair. general marshall once said, "the only way human beings can win a war is to prevent it." those words were true in his time, and they are true in our time. last month, our nation was attacked again. a u.s. ambassador and three fellow americans are dead, murdered in benghazi, libya. among the dead or three veterans, all on a mission of peace and friendship t
her education or four for filling her dreams in her career. i want to acknowledge there and many women and many families who do continue to strive and to accomplish those things and you love children who are not planned very much and i applaud those families, but it can be a difficult circumstance and it can be a barrier for many women. and that really robs all of us have the potential that those women have to contribute amazing accomplishments and amazing ideas for public discourse that were not able to hear from them because of these types of barriers. we have seen that historically over the last two decades, i mean open wide access to contraception is something i made an incredible difference to being able to have careers, being able to hold elected office, being able to be part of our larger public discourse and the ceos and contribute to our society and that way. so it is important that we make that option available to all the women in our communities. we know that women who have trouble affording contraception are disproportionately from low income communities. this is common sen
in on those promises. it is government negligence to educate its foreign students and require them to leave. no place should do that. it is part of the economic strategy for growth in the future. you want to be a magnet for the best talents in the world. we will compete for the best talents. we have the best environment for that talent. >> energy and then campaign finance. >> you are looking at california right now. their massive increases in the costs. when consumers are paying for gasoline, they're not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. what is happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulation that impact energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the costs of energy. we need to have the same focus of discussion in washington. what is happening in california can happen -- >> it is harder to buy gas in california and hawaii, from what i heard. -- than hawaii, from what i heard. >> if you have a stool with two legs, it will fall over. look at what the canadians did with their cash cow. we have more of a cash cow in energy than anyon
the department of education, against funding for meals on wheels for seniors, against a holiday for martin luther king, against a resolution calling for the release of nelson mandela in south africa. it is amazing to hear him criticize my record or john kerry's. >> the -- the record speaks for itself, and frankly is not distinguished. >> a portion of the vice- presidential debate from 2004. tonight, watching and engage with c-span as the vice- presidential candidates meet for their only debate. our live previous starts its 7:00 p.m. eastern. the debate continues at which it starts at 9:00, and then your opportunity -- starts at 9:00, and then your opportunity for feedback. we will take you live to danville, just outside of the hall with the debate will take place and a look at the media gathering in the advance of tonight's debate. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> again, a look at the norton center for the arts, the site of tonight's debate beginning at 7, our coverage on c-span. and, if he missed any of the debate
to her life may not be over yet. >> she was attacked and shot by have an education and don'trls want girls to speak for themselves and don't want girls to become leaders. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? megyn: well, the showdown is set to go tonight here in danville, kentucky. this is the stage where vice president biden and congressman paul ryan will go toe to toe. four years ago some said joe biden was careful not to be too aggressive in his match-up with governor sarah palin. but today there is word of a very different plan. they are saying the gloves will be off. the 2008 debate in st. louis was one of the most-watched ever for the vice presidential candidates, 70 million tv viewers tuned in. and here's a look back at some of the most memorable moments. [cheers and applause] >> nice to meet you. hey, can i call you joe? >> you sure can. >> okay, thanks. thank you, gwen. thank you.
lines. she was targeted by the taliban for demanding that girls get equal access to education. and they say the next 24 hours after surgery are going to be critical. 10 doctors waiting to see if the extreme swelling in her head will hopefully be reduced. >> amazing some times the role she has taken on in society. what a symbol she has become. at a young age. what she is fighting for, something we take for granted. she is literally fighting for her life because of the cause there. the doctor said one doctor said the bullet has affected some parts of her brain, but there's a 70% chance she will survive. certainly welcome news. all thinking and praying for her. brave little girl. >> for sure. >>> moving on dozens of american airlines pilots put their labor frustration on display in the nation's capital. the pilots protested at reagan national airport saying the carrier received bankruptcy court approval to reject the cba, they complained, management is implementing new terms that adversely affect their working conditions, pay, and retirement. >> american's dra
in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> lacrosse, wisconsin, the vice president, i was just told the crowd booed as he started talking debate and mentioned the words paul ryan. let's listen. >> anyone who watched that debate, i don't think there is any doubt that congressman ryan and i, governor romney and the president, we have a fundamentally different vision for america and quite frankly a fundamentally different value set. and the fact is that the differences that we have about the future of this country are quite frankly profound, as profound as any differences any presidential campaign that i've observed, that i've been involved in. the truth is that i think people were listening. and if they were, they know what some of those differences are, and they know how those differences can fundamentally affect the direction of this country. one of those areas was an area of afghanistan. i made it absolutely clear on behalf of the president and i that we are leaving afghanistan in 2014, period. there is no ifs, ands or b
the citizens alive and well and educated and housed. barack obama doesn't provide that nor does this country. >> bill: you and i are in the same union do you know that after sag. it's not militant enough for you. >> no. >> bill: i think you and i should run for president and vice president. i'll be the president and you be the vice president of the union. [ laughter ] >> bill: i would send you on peace keeping missions. >> that u.n. stirred up. >> bill: i like my union but what i don't like is the municipal unions it's not the fault of the workers who have now negotiated contracts that we can't pay. that's what happened in wisconsin, that's what's happening all over the place. your state, california, bankrupt. it can't pay the pensions. >> i see the municipal workers and the teachers as being the last preservation of organized labor in this country. we borrow and borrow and borrow and borrow but now it's all coming to the end because they can't borrow any more money. the workers are going to have to take it on the chin a little bit the municipal workers. they are just going to have to. >> ju
in not having any of these social issues, whether they were women's reproductive rights, education and other things mentioned in the first debate and then even as an add on in the second debate is that people made the -- i call it the excuse, well, this is about jobs, as if social issues are not also economic issues, especially reproductive choice. that when women have history -- when women have control over their reproductive choice, it also lends to their control over their economic destiny and that's really, i think, what this is about. for a party that portends to say that we want smaller and less government, you know, they certainly want to put an awful lot of area between me and my doctor. >> what i find frustrating, marsha blackburn was on msnbc after the debate. she responded to chris matthews. the other day on twitter i was talking about abortion and a lot of conservatives said, why are you liberals always talking about abortion. conservatives in the republican party don't want to talk about this. ryan had this big sigh and this kind of gathering himself moment after he was asked th
. >> reporter: the dream act. the development relief and education for alien minors. they rallied at the casade maryland multicultural center in langley park before marching to the university of maryland at college park. >> we have an argument on on the on [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: they spoke in english and spanish. [ speaking spanish ] >> reporter: the largely hispanic crowd of demonstrators shared personal stories of their fears and angst of being undocumented immigrants. >> both of my parents were deported and i found myself lost. i found myself depressed. >> reporter: a co-sponsor of the legislation insisted it's not a giveaway. >> you must first graduate from a maryland high school. okay, your parents have to pay taxes. >> reporter: they were told the dream act has university support. >> it is a misconception that getting you the opportunity to go to college will keep other folks out. as a college president, i'm telling you it ain't true. >> reporter: it was five miles to the maryland campus, which many of the students hope to one day attend. these dreamers are not just marching. it's
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 121 (some duplicates have been removed)